The deadline for complying with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is rapidly approaching, and many companies still aren't prepared, according to a newly released study by security research firm Crowd Research Partners.

GDPR, a set of rules developed by the European Parliament, European Council, and European Commission to ensure data protection for individuals within the European Union (EU), officially takes effect on May 25, 2018. Any company that handles data for individuals within the coverage area is affected, and the penalties for non-compliance can be up to 4 percent of the violating company's global annual revenue.

Also: GDPR Pro Review

The Crowd Research report, based on the results of an online survey of more than 531 IT, cyber security, and complianceprofessionals, shows that 60 percent of surveyed organizations are likely to miss the compliance deadline.

Just 40 percent of those surveyed said they're either GDPR-compliant or well on their way to compliance in time for the deadline, and only 7 percent said they're in full compliance with GDPR requirements.

Many of the organizations (80 percent) concede that GDPR compliance is a top priority, yet only half said they are knowledgeable about the data privacy legislation or have deep expertise with regard to the regulation. What's even more alarming is that given the amount of publicity surrounding GDPR, one quarter of the organizations said they have no knowledge or only limited knowledge of the law.

"What is striking in this study is the lack of staff with GDPR expertise and an overall underestimation of the effort required to meet GDPR, which represents the most sweeping change in data privacy regulation in decades," said Holger Schulze, CEO of Cybersecurity Insiders and founder of the Information Security Community on LinkedIn, which commissioned the study.

The new digital commerce battleground will be won with customer experience. But the decision you make about your commerce architecture now will either future-proof your platform or set you up for trouble. There are three approaches to commerce architecture, read more to find out which best meets your business goals.

White Papers provided by IBM

The main compliance challenges facing organizations are a lack of expert staff (cited by 43 percent), lack of budget (40 percent), and a limited understanding of GDPR regulations (31 percent). Most of the organizations (56 percent) expect their data governance budget will increase, which will help in addressing the GDPR challenges.

WHAT'S HOT ON ZDNET

About one third of the organizations said they'll need to make big changes to their data security practices and systems to comply with GDPR, and more than half expect to make only minor changes.

At most organizations, IT and information security teams have the main responsibility for meeting GDPR compliance. A majority of them said making an inventory of user data, and mapping the data to protected GDPR categories, is a priority in their GDPR compliance efforts. This is followed by evaluating, developing, and integrating systems that support GDPR compliance.

Also: Affiliate Domination Blueprint Review

Most of the organizations' insider threat programs are not meeting GDPR reporting guidelines, the report said. GDPR's "Right to Explanation" gives EU citizens the right not to be subject to a decision based solely on automated processing. About one third of the organizations said their current automated assessment techniques are "black boxed." That means they're not able to explain how the algorithms made a decision.

Most GDPR-relevant data is stored on premises. But about one third of the organizations store data in the cloud or in hybrid IT environments, which makes control over the data potentially more difficult, the report said.

EVERYONE has had loads of emails about updated privacy policies - and it's all to do with GDPR.

Here's what it stands for and what it really means for you.

AP:ASSOCIATED PRESS

2

Tech giants such as Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook are the main targets of the GDPR

What is GDPR? What does it stand for?

GDPR stands for the General Data Protection Regulation, a new set of rules that came into effect on May 25.

The GDPR is a piece of EU legislation passed by the European Parliament in 2016.

It aims to make it simpler for people to control how companies use their personal details.

Companies will not be allowed to collect and use personal information without the person's consent.

Data includes things like a person's name, email address and phone number, and also internet browsing habits collected by website cookies.

Firms must also report any data breaches - including cyber attacks and accidental leaks - to authorities within 72 hours.

It applies to all companies that collect data in the UK - even after Brexit, as the government is enshrining the same rules in UK law.

Privacy campaigners have hailed the regulation as a step forward for online rights, but small firms are furious about the administrative burden of complying with the law.

ALAMY

2

Breaches of cyber-security could result in multimillion-pound fines

What does GDPR mean for me?

The number of emails we have been receiving is the first thing most of us noticed about GDPR.

It means you have been on a company's mailing list, have bought something from them before or agreed to receive marketing.

You probably ticked a consent box once - but that was under the old rules.

Now firms have to ask your consent to continue collecting and storing your data.

That is why they are asking you to agree to their new privacy policies. They are complying with the new rules in force from May 25.

In future, GDPR means individuals can demand a copy of all data held about them, which must be supplied within 30 days.

And in some cases they can ask for any data to be deleted in a formal "right to be forgotten" law.

If you also run a business - even as a sole trader - you need to make sure you comply with the law on collecting your customers' data.

Last year handymen, gardeners and window cleaners were warned they could be fined if they try to drum up business by sending an email.

Read our guide to the GDPR compliance deadline.

When does GDPR start?

GDPR comes into force today – businesses and organisations impacted by GDPR have had two years to get their systems ready.

Companies who fail to comply but have shown awareness and taken steps to comply with GDPR will be treated less harshly than those who have not.

Fines will be issued to those who do not comply.

THE General Data Protection Regulation – which has now come into force – is the biggest shakeup of personal data privacy rules since the birth of the internet.

It is aimed at curbing US tech giants like Facebook - but sole traders such as plumbing and window cleaners could face crippling fines if they fall foul of the law. Here's what you need to know.

AP:ASSOCIATED PRESS

3

Tech giants such as Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook are the main targets of the GDPR

What is GDPR and when does it take effect? Get the best Sun stories with our daily Sun10 newsletter

Your information will be used in accordance with our privacy policy

The General Data Protection Regulation is a piece of EU legislation passed by the European Parliament in 2016.

It became enforceable in all EU countries on Friday, May 25.

Punishing fines for data misuse and breaches can reach £18million or 4 per cent of global annual turnover, whichever is higher.

The GDPR aims to make it simpler for people to control how companies use their personal details.

Strict rules mean companies will not be allowed to collect and use personal information without the person's consent.

Data includes things like a person's name, email address and phone number, and also internet browsing habits collected by website cookies.

Firms must also report any data breaches - including cyber attacks and accidental leaks - to authorities within 72 hours.
Individuals can demand a copy of all data held about them, which must be supplied within 30 days.

And in some cases they can ask for any data to be deleted in a formal "right to be forgotten" law.

Privacy campaigners have hailed the regulation as a new step forward for online rights, but small firms are furious about the burden of complying with the law.

ALAMY

3

Breaches of cyber-security could result in multimillion-pound fines

Will GDPR still apply after Brexit?

The government says the same rules will continue to apply after the UK formally leaves the EU.

GDPR standards will soon be enshrined in UK statute in the Data Protection Bill currently going through Parliament.

Ministers say this will help companies prepare for Brexit as it will mean British law is aligned with the rest of Europe.

Officials say it would be harder to trade if the rules were different on either side of the Channel.

The GDPR will apply to any company offering services in the EU, regardless of where it is headquartered.

ALAMY

3

Gardeners and other sole traders are among those affected by new EU laws on data protection

What does GDPR mean for businesses?

Almost everyone has received emails from companies asking customers and users whether they consent to the new conditions.

When there were just 100 days until the rules came into force, a government studyshowed only 38 per cent of British firms were even aware of GDPR, let alone ready to comply.

Business groups have said companies will have to spend £1.2million each on average to prepare for the complex rules on data processing.

Ahead of the changes, many did not track their data processing in a way that complies with the new rules.

And if they have sought consent from customers to collect data, often the records were out of date or the consents do not meet the GDPR standards.

Facebook and Google are among the firms likely to be most affected by the changes.

They make money from people's data by using it to target advertising at their interests.

Retailers, insurers and banks are also likely to have to make the biggest changes to ensure they comply.

In January 2018 Facebook published a post detailing its "privacy principles" for the first time.

Erin Egan, Chief Privacy Officer at Facebook, said that the principles "guide our work" and the company wants to give users "more control of your privacy".

The guidelines state: "We recognise that people use Facebook to connect, but not everyone wants to share everything with everyone – including with us."

Critics said the social media giant - with two billion users - had been forced into the move by GDPR and the guidelines "crib large chunks" of the EU regulation.

Small businesses and charity fundraisers face a major headache as most do not have the resources or expertise to make sure they comply with the new rules.

In 2017 handymen, gardeners and window cleaners were warned they could be fined if they try to drum up business by sending an email.

Potential customers would have to have given their explicit consent to each possible use of their personal information by ticking a box online or filling out a form.

Mike Cherry of the Federation of Small Businesses told The Sun: "Many small businesses are already straining under the burden of the current data protection regime and some will be having sleepless nights thinking about how GDPR will add to this."

Some firms fear they will fold if hit by fines.

http://guitarprince.hatenadiary.com/entry/gdpr-pro-review

http://guitar-prince.jigsy.com/entries/wp-theme-and-plugin/gdpr-pro-review

All Posts
×

Almost done…

We just sent you an email. Please click the link in the email to confirm your subscription!

OKSubscriptions powered by Strikingly